• JP Singh

    That’s the first time in the history of UC Berkeley that a Sikh Student Association was formed. It was Nineteen Seventy Eight.” JP Singh was a PhD students at UC Berkeley and describes the birth of the Association out of the student protests around a visit by then Indian Prime Minister Morarji Desai after the 1978 Sikh killings. In the 30 years that followed, JP Singh became known as a specialist in GeoEngineering, Earthquake Engineering & Seismology, having worked on […]

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  • Gurpreet Kaur Sodhi

    “You know it’s funny, I was talking to somebody at work about it and I told her my Dad was a Khalistani. And she is Punjabi Hindu. And I told her “Why do I feel like I have to defend this to you?” And she said “Well you don’t, because I understand.” And unfortunately, I think Khalistani is synonymous with terrorist. And with the past. And I think… a lot of people got involved for their own personal gain. And… […]

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  • Bachhitar Singh

    I don’t want to go back to India. Never, I never say I’m proud to be Indian.” What causes him to say that? In his narrative, Bachhitar Singh –still too wary to show his face on video when speaking about 1984—re-lives a strikingly painful past as he shares how his home was looted, his parents mistreated, and life uprooted simply because he is a Sikh. He recounts why and how he was forced to leave his home, take shelter with Christian […]

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  • Balvinder Singh Randhawa

    During a recent Memory Studios in Toronto, Balvinder Singh Randhawa, shares how the attack on Punjab in June 1984 affected him and his Sikh friends growing up in New Delhi.How they developed an immediate desire to resist in various ways, including committing to speaking only Punjabi among themselves. “”If I hadn’t left, I would have joined the movement,” he now reflects as an adult, seeking to channel that outrage into positivity, memory, and, seeking to keep the memories of the […]

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  • Navjot Kaur

    Finally the telegram came from Punjab and young Navjot Kaur’s aunt informed her that their family was alright. Except, Navjot was then living on an army base, where adult conversations signaled things were far from right. Listen to experience how a fourth-grader felt the fear that set in the mind of her Aunty, the sole Sikh teacher working in an Army Cantt, as the news about the attack travelled outside of Punjab, 10 to 15 days later, and Sikhs everywhere […]

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  • Manjit Kaur

    “Sky was all red at night… but later on we started smelling it…that’s how we knew what was going on.” Many skies went red all over Punjab in June 1984. Hear Manjit Kaur recount her experiences over 125 miles from Amritsar, in Patiala, where she was an eyewitness to the destruction at Gurudwara Dukh Nivaran Sahib. “The babies’ stuff [strewn in the gurudwara] is what I remember most.”

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  • Mhinder Singh

    Eyewitness to the June attack, Mhidner Singh was trapped inside the Darbar Saab (“Golden Temple”) during the firefight. He recounts how–on the signal of a whistle–soldiers began shooting at civilians who were rounded up, sitting, unarmed. He himself survived lying under dead bodies for hours. Those who survived did so by sheer chance, he says; there was no other recourse for anyone, of any age. He witnessed young people being stripped naked and killed. His companions and him took to sieving dirty […]

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  • Manmeet Kaur

    Manmeet Kaur, a Columbia MBA, social justice entrepreneur, and Founder of NY non-profit City Health Works, was less than a year old and living in Queens, New York in 1984. Instead of what could have been an upbringing disconnected from the events of 1984, she grew up fully aware of the devastation. She recalls interconnected anecdotes of her childhood, discusses the influence 84 had on her identity as a Sikh and how individual members of her family responded to the massacre […]

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  • Rasil Basu

    Rasil Basu, who served as the Director, UN Center for Women’s Advancement in NY, recounts the shock of hearing about the attack on Darbar Sahib, while sitting in her apartment in Manhattan, New York, in June 1984; and then the looting and arson of her property and the threat to her and her brother, noted Sikh writer S. Patwant Singh, in Gurgaon in November 1984. Hear her explain how the stolen goods from her house were last seen last in […]

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  • Narinder Singh Kapany

    Narinder Singh Kapany, known as the ‘Father of Fiber Optics, was the President of his company Kaptron Inc. in Palo Alto, California, at the time of the 1984 attacks. He narrates the buildup to the 84 attacks and the telegrams he sent to the Indira Gandhi Government. He explains how the massacre in Amritsar prompted the trustees of the Sikh Foundation to prepare full-page advertisements for newspapers in New York, Washington DC, Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco to inform […]

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  • Rajvinder Singh Bains

    How Sikhs went from fearless defenders of others to those who had to begin focusing on defending themselves. Noted human rights lawyer, Rajvinder Singh Bains, Punjab & Haryana High Court, shares his experiences of 1984 and how it re-pivoted his political ideology, informs his identity as a Sikh, and his life’s work.

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  • Harinder Singh Padam

    June & November 1984, the time in between, and since: Dotting his story with drawings of his memories, Harinder Singh Padam narrates his eyewitness account of watching the June attacks from his Amritsar rooftop. He tells of the increased tensions and military presence around Amritsar leading up the attacks and shares his sense of trepidation in feeling that something was going to happen. In November, he was in Gurgaon and recounts hiding during the Delhi killings, including being forced to cut […]

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